Labour

SOS NHS Derby End the winter crisis with a cash injection to restore the NHS budget Commit to increased funding each year End the cap on NHS pay No cuts, no closures, no privatisation – #SOSNHSDerby #NHS in Crisis: Fix It Now! Transport to London February 3rd #NHS Emergency Demonstration #NHS30218 #Derby People’s Assembly Against Austerity: #Derbyuk #Derbyshire

Aside Posted on Updated on

*End the winter crisis with a cash injection to restore the NHS budget
*Commit to increased funding each year
*End the cap on NHS pay
*No cuts, no closures, no privatisation

Join the demonstration in London On Saturday 3 February.



Dear Friends

Our NHS is in a serious crisis. Ambulances queuing for hours to hand over seriously ill patients, patients left in corridors waiting for beds, operations postponed, and mental health patients taken hundreds of miles to find a bed.

Theresa May & Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt issued a hollow apology and deny any crisis! But the problem comes from deliberate government policy of cuts, bed closures, pay restraint and privatisation.

Our NHS has been starved of funding with inadequate investment in staff and resources. 8,000 front line beds and 20% of mental health beds have closed. Eight years of below inflation pay settlements have contributed to 100,000 vacant posts for health professionals – leaving no spare capacity for peaks of demand & increasing the pressure on the dedicated staff who remain.
We don’t want apologies, we demand change.

On 3 February Health campaigns together are organising a national day of action – an emergency demonstration in London and nationwide protests to demand:

End the winter crisis with a cash injection to restore the NHS budget
Commit to increased funding each year
End the cap on NHS pay
No cuts, no closures, no privatisation

Join the demonstration in London On Saturday 3 February.

Coaches are leaving Derby Bus Station at 8:00am. Book tickets from mozgreenshields@gmail.com or text 07889 274723. Tickets are £10, £5 concessions, and free for the unwaged. SOS NHS DERBY is asking all our supporters to come along.
Coaches are leaving Chesterfield Town Hall, Rose Hill, S40 1LP) at 8:00am. Phone or text 07778480484 to book a seat.

Protest and present the ‘protect the 535 beds’ petition to the County Council on Wednesday the February 7, 1.30 pm.

Don’t forget that supporters from across Derbyshire will be attending the Derbyshire County Council Full meeting on Wednesday 7th February, at County Hall, Matlock, at 1.30 pm.

The plan is to protests outside then present the petition against the plan to cut 535 hospital beds to the Council. (If you haven’t signed the petition please do so, we still need a few hundred signatures to trigger the 30 minute debate). Click on this link to say you will join us

Copyright © 2018 SOS NHS Derby, All rights reserved.

Thanks you for giving us your email address when you signed the 535 beds petition, you can unsubscribe anytime that you wish.

We urge that you stay connected with us because there are lots of things to do in our campaign to save the NHS.

Advertisements

Ralf Littlte knocks Block off #Conservative #NHS Privatiser and Murdoch fan boy Jeremy Hunt #Mental Health #Derbyuk #Derbyshire #Derby

Aside Posted on Updated on

Jeremy Corbyn Proud to Be a Socialist

Aside Posted on

Published on Sep 26, 2015

Exclusive interview for teleSUR with Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn http://multimedia.telesurtv.net/v/jer…

Austerity Is a Choice, Labour Must Offer Another: Jeremy Corbyn #Labour MP for Islington North

Aside Posted on Updated on

Posted: 07/09/2015 15:33 BST Updated: 07/09/2015 15:59 BST

Austerity is a political choice not an economic necessity. When the Chancellor rose to his feet at the emergency Budget in July, and when he does so for his Spending Review in October, what is being put forward is an ideologically-driven rolling back of the state.

The analysis published today by the TUC reveals how the Budget gives money to the rich, but takes away from the poor.

jeremy corbyn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the Conservative project, dressed up in the post-crisis language of budget deficits and national debt for extra impetus. Inequality doubled under the Thatcher government, and her heirs seem to be doing all they can to ensure that legacy is extended.

The Budget showed austerity is about political choices, not economic necessities. There is money available: the inheritance tax cuts announced in the Budget will lose the exchequer over £2.5billion in revenue between now and 2020. What responsible government committed to closing the deficit would give a tax break that only applies to the richest 4% of households?

The Conservatives are giving away to the very rich in inheritance tax cuts twice as much as reducing the benefit cap will raise by further impoverishing the poorest, and socially cleansing many towns and cities.

Another choice was to cut UK corporation tax to 18%, which at 20% is already the lowest in the G7, lower too than the 25% in China, and half the 40% rate in the United States.

The Treasury estimates that this political choice will see our revenue intake from big business fall by £2.5billion in 2020. That’s nearly twice the amount saved by cutting the tax credits available families with more than two children.

In such circumstances, Labour must be clear: we oppose the Budget, and we oppose austerity. As a group of 40 economists wrote to the Observer a few weeks ago, “opposition to austerity is actually mainstream economics, even backed by the conservative IMF”.

Read more here

Has the Labour party outlived its usefulness?

Aside Posted on Updated on

The 1977 Grunwick strike was crushed by police with the full support of the Labour government.

The 1977 Grunwick strike was crushed by police with the full support of the Labour government. Photograph: Press Association Images

Has the Labour party outlived its usefulness?

Labour’s time could be up. History says that it could be reborn in a different guise and with a different purpose

Does it matter if the Labour party survives its current crisis? History suggests not. Labour, and the British left, has been massively defeated. However, in broad historical terms, one might argue that this defeat didn’t happen on 7 May 2015 but in the late 1960s and 1970s. Labour’s era may now be over and perhaps it is time for something new.

Its heyday was in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Clement Attlee’s Labour party was the party of the welfare state and full employment, with trade unions fully incorporated into national bargaining because they represented a massive section of the workforce. The party had concrete policies that spoke to people’s needs and desires – from which the current operation could learn .

In the late 1960s, this consensus broke apart. Foreign competition and the assertive, but reasonable demands of young workers for more say over the way their industries were managed led certain big businesses to organise into the Confederation of British Industries (CBI) and demand the reduction of workers’ rights.

Barbara Castle’s white paper, In Place of Strife, began talking of strikers and trade unionists as separate from, rather than representative of, “the public”. Edward Heath’s Conservative administrations and the succeeding Labour government took this policy further. In 1976, Labour accepted that an economic downturn should be remedied by accepting International Monetary Fund aid, conditional on massive public spending cuts.

The following year, a huge strike for trade union recognition by Asian women at the Grunwick film processing plant was crushed by police with the full support of the Labour government and the Conservative opposition. The rest, as they say, is history, including the national Labour leadership’s failure to support the 1984-85miners’ strike.

Read more